Academic journal article Professional School Counseling

School Counseling: Continuing the Discussion and Enhancing the Profession

Academic journal article Professional School Counseling

School Counseling: Continuing the Discussion and Enhancing the Profession

Article excerpt

My hope is that the four articles of the December issue of Professional School Counseling, which focused on school counseling from perspec- fives of the past, present, and future, provided relevant content for your consideration. In addition, I am hopeful that the response articles presented in this issue will provide an impetus to move the profession and school counselors, both individually and collectively, to seek ways to be active participants in enhancing the profession to more effectively meet the counseling needs of students.

Paisley and Borders (1998) stated, "As school counseling moves forward into the twenty-first century, educators and practitioners would do well to remember the history and evolutionary nature of the specialty. It is unlikely that the dialogue or debate concerning school counseling is complete" (p. 165). The discussion is not complete; however, it seems important to be proactive. Lenhardt and Young (2001) stated that "Counselors must expand their roles from change agents in school buildings to facilitators of change in public and political arenas" (p. 188). My hope is that the potential discussions created by the initial articles and the responses presented in this issue will stimulate action at the individual and organizational level. I believe the issues and discussions presented are relevant, timely, and important to the profession, and that it is important to initiate and continue appropriate action relative to the issues raised.

Welch and McCarroll (1993), in their discussion of the future role of school counselors, used an analogy to describe their recommendation for the role of the school counselor. They stated:

... we cannot drive into the future looking in the rearview mirror. The future demands that there be some vision, some imagination, some preparation based on the report of our scouts. Our scouts tell us that the future will not be like the past. It will apparently be less like the past than at any time in our history. Things are changing rapidly. (p. 52)

As the 21st Century unfolds, it is clear that school counselors need to take an active role in addressing professional issues and meeting the needs of all students. As Bemak (2000) noted, "The reconceptualization of the school counselor's role as a leader and change agent-advancing school, community, and family collaboration-is essential" (p. 330). …

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