Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

Editor's Notes

Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

Editor's Notes

Article excerpt

As we move through the days after September 11, it is very natural to wonder about what is most important in our teaching and learning and thinking together as an Anglican community. Being agents of God's reconciling work is likely to make us hungry for theological nourishment. The present issue provides an abundant variety.

The first segment of this issue, Teaching the Bible in a New Millennium, guest edited by Stephen L. Cook and Robert W Prichard of Virginia Theological Seminary, brings us into a forum for reflection about the use of Scripture in our teaching and learning and training for ministry. The discussion offers us creative ways to think about our own life with Scripture. It is our hope that these papers will form part of a larger conversation on curriculum revision.

The essays by Rebecca Lyman, Karl Plank, and Kevin Ward take us in different ways to the edges of habitual patterns of thought. They invite us to consider theology as it moves across borders of many kinds.

Poetry, reviews, and a timely survey by Catherine Wallace of writing in religion and culture all contribute their own kinds of insights. Robert Slocum's review essay on Phillips Brooks is one of a projected series to reclaim our Anglican theological heritage. The issue concludes with a most helpful entry in our regular Essential Reading column, this time on crucial texts for the life of the spirit by Ellen Charry.

About a year ago, as many of you will know, I suffered a stroke. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.