Academic journal article Australian Health Review

Measuring Health: A Guide to Rating Scales and Questionnaires

Academic journal article Australian Health Review

Measuring Health: A Guide to Rating Scales and Questionnaires

Article excerpt

Measuring health: a guide to rating scales and questionnaires McDowell I 3rd edition, Oxford University Press, 2006 ISBN: 0195165675. RRP: $130. xvi+748 pages

Measuring health provides a detailed discussion of 104 health measures. The author, Ian McDowell, is Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine at the University of Ottawa.

Chapter 1 is an introduction. Chapter 2 deals with "The theoretical and technical foundations of health measurement" (pp 10-54). The chapter describes various classes of numerical estimation, definitions of validity and reliability - and how one determines these characteristics. Some readers may regard this material as dry and uninteresting. But it is fundamental. In this chapter, McDowell provides a useful, yet compact, introduction to these theoretical ideas. The chapter has an extensive bibliography of 185 items. Graduate students embarking on research that involves scale measurements in health care (or fields such as education or management or sociology) would do well to read this chapter. It would be an excellent reference for any research methods subject. The author's engaging style makes the theoretical ideas more palatable.

The main part of the book describes 104 instruments for measuring various health conditions. This part is organised into eight chapters, where each chapter is devoted to scales that measure a particular aspect of health. For example, Chapter 3 deals with "Physical disability and handicap" and Chapter 7 deals with "Depression".

Let us look at a typical chapter. Chapter 9 on "Pain measurements" (pp 470-519) opens with a summary of theoretical approaches to pain and a discussion of the biomedical model of pain where cognition and emotion are factors that are taken into consideration in the assessment of pain. Other theories of pain that are outlined include psychodynamic theories, Melzacks gate control theory of pain, and the neuromatrix model. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.