Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Di Sal Man Alle Radebrechen: Todeswurdige Delikte Und Ihre Bestrafung in Text Und Bild der Codices Picturati Des Sachsenspiegels

Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Di Sal Man Alle Radebrechen: Todeswurdige Delikte Und Ihre Bestrafung in Text Und Bild der Codices Picturati Des Sachsenspiegels

Article excerpt

Friedrich Scheele, di sal man alle radebrechen: Todesivrdige Delikte und ihre Bestrafrng in Text und Bild der Codices picturati des Sachsenspiegels, I: Textband; II: Tafelband (Oldenburg: Isensee, 1992). 274 pp.; vi pp. + log plates. DM 190.

Friedrich Scheele's sumptuously reproduced dissertation comes from the Minster school of Professor Ruth Schmidt-Wiegand, the leading centre for research into early German legal codices. Pre-eminent among those are the four illustrated manuscripts (out of some 46o of the text) of Eike von Repgow's Sachsen..rspiegel. The present volume complements the Ig86 collection of essays on civil law edited by Schmidt-Wiegand, Text - Bild - Interpretation: Untersuchungen zu den Bilderhandschrften des Sach.renspiegels.

The opening chapter addresses the background, authorship and dating of the work and of the four illustrated manuscripts, and latest opinion on the relationship between them. The account of the legal background cogently places the Sachsenspiegel in a line of development of the criminal law marking the attempt to control the recourse to feuding, and the decline of the early medieval conception of personal justice through atonement or compensation, e.g. payment of wergild, in favour of a penal system. There follows a detailed classification and analysis of the treatment of the different capital crimes that might be punishable by death: homicide, rape, adultery, heresy, witchcraft, theft, arson and forgery. Some forms of criminal behaviour have quite different connotations from those of today, so that poisoning and magic are linked to lack of religious belief, and the treatment of rape reflects the transition from the early medieval conception of rape and abduction as identical, to their gradual differentiation from the thirteenth century on. The hierarchical patterns of medieval thought logically led to the theft of corn by day being punishable by beheading, by night by the more humiliating hanging; and the death penalty for a wife's adultery must be set not only against the qualified instances in the Sachsen,piegel stipulating the same penalty even for an adulterous husband, but also against the background in early Germanic law, according to which only a woman was considered capable of committing the offence at all. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.