Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Per la Storia del Pontificio Istituto Orientale: Saggi Sull'istituzione, I Suoi Uomini E l'Oriente Cristiano

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Per la Storia del Pontificio Istituto Orientale: Saggi Sull'istituzione, I Suoi Uomini E l'Oriente Cristiano

Article excerpt

Per la storia del Pontificio Istituto Orientale: Saggi sull' istituzione, i suoi uomini e l'Oriente Cristiano. By Vincenzo Poggi, S.J. [Orientalia Christiana Analecta, 263.] (Rome: Pontificio Istituto Orientale. 2000. Pp. 448, Paperback.)

This volume of the Orientalia Christians Analecta (263) is a collection of previously published materials on the foundation of the Pontifical Oriental Institute in Rome; on the development of its specialties in Oriental liturgy, Syriac patrology, Eastern Christian spirituality, the history of the Council of Florence, Eastern Catholic canon law, and Eastern Christian archaeology; and on the staff of the Institute that made these developments possible.

When Benedict XV founded the Institute on October 15, 1917, he built upon the work of Leo XIII for the Christian East and created a new Congregation and a new institute of studies that would work solely on the questions of the Eastern Churches. Father Antoine Delpuch ran the Institute in its first academic year with the title of acting president while the ultimate responsibility for the Institute lay in the hands of Cardinal Niccolo Marini, the cardinal secretary of the Congregation for the Eastern Churches. The first faculty consisted of distinguished professors taken from the diocesan clergy, the Assumptionists, the Benedictines, the Dominicans, and the Jesuits. On September 14, 1922, Pius XI entrusted the Institute to the Society of Jesus. The Jesuit General Ledochowski placed Michel d'Herbigny, S.J., as head of the Institute. His interesting career was treated in Antoine Wenger's Rome-Moscou (Paris, 1987). In June, 1924, d'Herbigny announced that Pius XI wished that there be a chair for the study of Islamic institutions at the Institute and former Muslim Father Paul Mulla (Mehemet Ali Mulla Zade) was called upon and taught at the Institute for thirtyfive years. For years the Institute consisted of only one department, Oriental Ecclesiastical Studies, with three branches, theological, liturgical-canonical, and historical. In 1963 the Pontifical Gregorian University became the means for granting academic degrees in Eastern Canon Law until in 1971 a separate department of Eastern Canon Law, the only one in the world, was created at the Institute. …

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