Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

John Carroll Recovered: Abstracts of Letters and Other Documents Not Found in the John Carroll Papers

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

John Carroll Recovered: Abstracts of Letters and Other Documents Not Found in the John Carroll Papers

Article excerpt

American

John Carroll Recovered: Abstracts of Letters and Other Documents Not Found in the John Carroll Papers. By Thomas W. Spalding with assistance of Paul K. Thomas. (Baltimore: Cathedral Foundation Press. 2000. Pp. xxxvi, 264. $35.00.)

This book, which will serve henceforth as an indispensable supplement to three-volume edition of The John Carroll Papers (JCP) published in 1976, owes its existence to Thomas Spalding's "unbounded admiration for John Carroll" (p. xxxi). Clearly a labor of love, it is at the same time an impressive monument to the scholarly energy and insight of collector-abstractor-editor Spalding, who gives us careful digests of 198 Carroll documents, none of which are included in JCP Roughly four-fifths of them date from 1800 to 1815 (the year of Carroll's death), the main source being a letterbook covering that period which is inadequately represented in JCP because the editor apparently relied on extracts made many years earlier by John Gilmary Shea. Spalding also located thirty new letters in the Propaganda Fide archives in Rome, ten in the Jesuits' Maryland Province archives, a dozen or so to Mother Seton in the archives of the Sisters of Charity of Mt. St. Vincent on the Hudson, and other letters, notations, and related documents in sources as diverse as the Cincinnati Catholic Telegraph and Advocate for March 19, 1853, and Ronald Hoffman's recently published study of the Carroll family,Princes of Ireland, Planters of Maryland.

Although most of the entries are brief, the abstract of a 1789 chronology drawn up by Carroll of events leading up to the establishment of the diocese of Baltimore takes up two printed pages. Even lengthier are digests of two letters to the Sulpician superior in Paris on the possibility that he might recall all his subjects in the United States, and abstracts of four letters to Rome dealing primarily with the erection of new dioceses and priests who might serve as their bishops. The latter are of particular interest in that they reveal the care with which Carroll approached these matters, and the anguish it cost him to make judgments about which of his fellow priests to recommend as bishops at a time when effective episcopal leadership was so crucial to the infant church. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.