Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

De L'oppression a la Liberte: L'Eglise En Hongrie, 1945-1992. Chronique Des Evenements Ordinaires et Extraordinaires, Temoins et Temoignages

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

De L'oppression a la Liberte: L'Eglise En Hongrie, 1945-1992. Chronique Des Evenements Ordinaires et Extraordinaires, Temoins et Temoignages

Article excerpt

De l'oppression a la libert L'Eglise en Hongrie, 1945-1992. Chronique des evements ordinaires et extraordinaires, temoins et temoignages. By Paul G. Bozsoky and Laszlo Lukacs. [Politiques & Chretiens.] (Paris: Beauchesne. 1993. Pp. vi, 381. 198 E)

In this volume one finds a short overview of the history of the Church in Hungary after 1945. Several essays and testimonies published here help us to understand the vicissitudes of the Catholics in Hungary before and during the Communist regime, and in the time of the political changes about the year 1989. The first part-a chronicle of the time-is written by the two authors. The first, Paul G. Bozsoky, a Franciscan Father who lives in Paris, has entitled his essay: "The long night of the Hungarian Christians" and deals with the period between 1945 and 1986. The second, Laszlo Lukacs, a Piarist Father who lives in Budapest, has written about the period after 1986; his title is: "From oppression to freedom," similar to the title of the whole book. A better title for the book could have been: "From freedom to freedom."

In the second part of the volume one finds some testimonies. Two historic personalities,Vilmos Apor, bishop of Gyor, who was killed by a Soviet soldier in 1945, and Cardinal Josef Mindszenty, the "two columns of God's presence,' are presented by Bozsoky. A third author of the book, a Catholic journalist, Istvan Elmer, has published here interviews with five personalities persecuted in these times: Vendel Endredy, abbot of the Cistercians; Istvan Tabody, a Catholic priest who organized clandestine priestly ordinations; Pius Halasz, a Cistercian monk; Gyorgy Bulanyi, a Piarist father, the founder of his movement, and Agnes Timar, a Cistercian nun and founder who started with the monastic life in the time of persecution and whose community survived the clandestinity. …

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