Academic journal article Mankind Quarterly

Biology at Work: Rethinking Sexual Equality

Academic journal article Mankind Quarterly

Biology at Work: Rethinking Sexual Equality

Article excerpt

Biology at Work: Rethinking Sexual Equality Kingsley R. Browne Rutgers University Press

Kingsley Browne, of Wayne State University, here approaches the inequality of men and women in the American market place, and examines the behavioral differences between men and women from the point of view of innate, evolutionary-determined behavioral differences between the sexes. His treatment of this much debated subject is perhaps unique in that he comes to the topic with a background in law. He therefore starts by asking whether there is any biological, as distinct from purely sociological, reason why there are so few female CEOs in Fortune 500 companies. This a question which immediately causes many ordinary observers to search for an explanation in prejudice and male chauvinism, which may often be present, at least in part. And of course, we all know that apart from possibility of male prejudice, women tend to drop out of work when they have babies, and so are less likely to be regarded as prospective long-term employees. But Browne is more openminded than to stop there.

Browne has read widely, and this causes him to ask whether there is any possible biological explanation why women, on average, earn less money than men, and are less likely to rise to high office in business. He recognizes the environmental determinants, which are truly powerful, but argues that evolution has shaped males and females for different roles in society. …

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