Academic journal article American Annals of the Deaf

An Examination of Twenty Literacy, Science, and Mathematics Practices Used to Educate Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Academic journal article American Annals of the Deaf

An Examination of Twenty Literacy, Science, and Mathematics Practices Used to Educate Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Article excerpt

THE RESULTS of a multistep process to begin identifying best practices in deaf education are presented. To identify current practices, a survey was conducted of the literature, the Web sites of professional organizations, and states' education Web sites, which yielded a number of commonly discussed practices. Ten of the more highly cited practices in literacy instruction and 10 of the more highly cited practices in science and mathematics instruction were identified for additional scrutiny. Hundreds of articles were examined to identify research support for the 20 identified practices. Some practices had adequate research support; others had minimal support. The authors identify each of the 20 practices, describe the practice, present a summary of the literature that was examined, and rate the usefulness of the knowledge base relative to a "best practice" designation.

Federal mandates surrounding the No Child Left Behind Act instruct schools to engage in best practices when instructing all students. This directive was part of the impetus for the development of a grant titled "Join Together" awarded to the Association of College Educators-Deaf/Hard of Hearing (ACE-DHH). Under the auspices of this grant, a team undertook several actions to gather information about practices in deaf education. In the present article we describe the process of identifying the practices, list each of the 20 practices we examined, provide an expanded definition of each practice, and identify some of the literature that may support each practice.

The team, referred to as Topical Team 2.2, engaged in a multistep process to examine deaf education practices. First, it reviewed best-practices Web sites, looked at states' curriculum Web sites, interviewed representatives of state agencies responsible for curriculum and instruction for students who are deaf or hard of hearing, and considered the literature in literacy, science, and mathematics as it related to students who are deaf or hard of hearing, in order to generate possible practices for inclusion in the document. The team generated a list of 10 practices in literacy and 10 practices in science and mathematics that were routinely cited either in the literature or as field-supported practices. The original set of practices was shared with the ACE-DHH community via the organization's listserv as well as the Master Teacher listserv of the Join Together grant, which led to a modification of some of the wording associated with the practices. Upon review of the original practices, the team noted that the practice of reading and writing in the content area was identified under both literacy and the content areas of science and mathematics. This practice was reassigned solely to literacy to avoid redundancy. In addition, reviewers of the original list indicated that the first science/mathematics practice was quite extensive and needed to be considered as two practices. This advice was followed, the result being the list of 20 practices identified in the present article and examined at greater length.

A caveat is warranted at this juncture. Inclusion in the list of practices that resulted from the selection process we have described is not intended to imply that any of the selections are best practices; rather, they are examined practices. Neither does exclusion from the list imply that other practices are not of equal value. The described practices do not represent an exhaustive list and are not the only practices that are successful with students who are deaf or hard of hearing. In addition, the literature cited in the present article is not intended to be taken as an exhaustive list of the available research studies, but, rather, as some of the highlights of a review of nearly 500 articles.

Literacy Practices

In this section of the present article we list the 10 literacy practices that were researched, provide an expanded definition of each practice, then present the literature in support of the practice. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.