Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Les Jésuites À Lyon XVI^sup E^-XX^sup E^ Siècles

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Les Jésuites À Lyon XVI^sup E^-XX^sup E^ Siècles

Article excerpt

Les jésuites à Lyon XVI^sup e^-XX^sup e^ siècles. Edited by Etienne Fouilloux and Bernard Hours. [Collection Société, Espaces,Temps.] (Lyon: ENS éditions. 2005. Pp. 274.euro32.00 paperback.)

The thirteen studies on Jesuit history presented here, papers given at a conference held in Lyon in September 2002, all show a high level of scholarship, offer a wealth of information drawn from extensive research, and are interestingly written, from the introduction by Bernard Hours to the conclusion by Etienne Fouilloux.

Part I, consisting of five studies on "L'ancienne Compagnie," the Society of Jesus before the Suppression in 1773, begins with Yann Lignereux's "Une implantation difficile: controverse religieuse et polémiques politiques (1565-l607)."This first stage of Jesuit presence in Lyon, after a few years of tensions mainly with King Henri TV, seems to have resulted in general feelings of esteem among the Lyonnais for the Jesuits. Annie Regond's article tells of a very gifted and famous Jesuit architect at the Collège de la Trinité, Brother Etienne Martellange. Stéphane van Damme's insightful article,"Le corps professoral du college," offers much information on the stress on scholarship and the way the Jesuit province of Lyon consistently devoted resources to the school. Sophie Roux offers a very interesting article on another very gifted individual Lyon Jesuit, Father Honoré Fabri (1607-1688), who in his day was well known in the field of philosophy of nature. Yves Jocteur-Montrozier's "Des jésuites et de la bibliothèque municipale de Lyon," is an especially valuable report on thé rôle of the Jesuits in the building of their large, much-admired library, confiscated by the city at the Suppression.

Part II,"Le temps des collèges," moves into the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Philippe Rocher very competently traces significant developments in teaching in Jesuit education in Lyon from 1850 to 1950. Bruno Dumons, in "Jésuites lyonnais et catholicisme intransigeant," offers an extremely interesting study of the role of a number of Jesuits in supporting and inspiring Catholics of the traditionalist, anti-liberal, anti-Third Republic viewpoint. The strongly anti-clerical Republic outlawed Catholic schools in 1901, and Patrick Cabanel's article tells how the Lyon Jesuits managed to re-create one of their schools in exile in Bollengo, Italy. …

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