Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

The Chrodegang Rules: The Rules for the Common Life of the Secular Clergy from the Eighth and Ninth Centuries. Critical Texts with Translations and Commentary

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

The Chrodegang Rules: The Rules for the Common Life of the Secular Clergy from the Eighth and Ninth Centuries. Critical Texts with Translations and Commentary

Article excerpt

The Chrodegang Rules: The Rules for the Common Life of the Secular Clergy from the Eighth and Ninth Centuries. Critical Texts with Translations and Commentary. By Jerome Bertram. [Church, Faith, and Culture in the Medieval West.] (Burlington, Vermont: Ashgate Publishing Company. 2005. Pp. x, 293. $99.95.)

The eighth-century bishop Chrodegang of Metz (d. 766) had a deep influence on the early medieval Church. Building on the reforming spirit of St. Boniface, Chrodegang's efforts to regulate the lives of secular clergy formed one of the cornerstones of Christian order under the Carolingians and influenced the tenth-century Benedictine reforms in England. In this volume, Jerome Bertram attempts to make some of the sources for Chrodegang-often only found in rare Latin editions-more accessible for a wider public. His interest is not historical per se but rather pastoral, providing part of a call to isolated Catholic clergy to re-establish a form of communal living. There are things to be gained, he argues, by studying the history of the vita communis so that those who do not take the monastic vow to renounce property can still effectively engage with their pastoral responsibilities.

Bertram offers us editions of three texts with accompanying translations: the Regula sancti Chrodegangi of c. 755, the Aachen Institutio Canonicorum of c. 816, and the later-ninth-century Regula Longior Canonicorum. Although only the first of these texts is actually by Chrodegang himself, Benedict of Aniane's decrees at Aachen were deeply indebted to the spirit of Chrodegang's work, while the Regula Longior represents a heavily interpolated reworking of the earlier Regula to the extent that it is sometimes mistakenly thought to be by the bishop of Metz himself. The Latin editions are largely taken from those by, respectively, Jean-Baptiste Pelt (1937), Albert Werminghof (1906), and Arthur Napier (1916) with only minor amendments; but their inclusion is anyway to make the texts more available, not to supersede them. It is regrettable that chapters 1-113 of the Institutio-mainly a collection of quotations from Isidore and church councils-were excluded. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.