Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Good Newes from Fraunce; French Anti-League Propaganda in Late Elizabethan England

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Good Newes from Fraunce; French Anti-League Propaganda in Late Elizabethan England

Article excerpt

Good Newes from Fraunce; French Anti-League Propaganda in Late Elizabethan England. By Lisa Ferraro Parmelee. (Rochester, New York: University of Rochester Press; Boydell & Brewer, Inc. 1996. Pp. ix, 204. $45.00.)

The influence of French political writings on Stuart England has already been treated by J. M. H. Salmon, the author's mentor, in his The Frencb Religious Wars in English Political Thought and more briefly by J. P Somerville in his Politics and Ideology in England, 1603-1640.The author, while acknowledging the help received from these two authors, concentrates on the influence of French thought on England during the last dozen years of Queen Elizabeth's reign.

There were at least two things France and England had in common during these two years.The first was a succession problem.Who would succeed to the throne? The second was a religious problem. Each had an established church along with a sizable religious minority.This is a thorough study not only of the influence of French political thought but also the process by which that influence was effected."

This volume is well organized.There is a good deal of useful material about printing and translation in England. And there is an extensive treatment of the calamity the French experienced and the English feared: civil war with religious overtones. Of course, it came to England a generation later in what one English historian has called the last of the wars of religion."

One of the chief pro-League and revolutionary items on the origins of political power had an English source. It was De Justa Reipublicae in Reges Impios et haereticos. . . Authoritate, published in Paris in 1590. It was signed G.G.R.A. There was another edition published in Antwerp in 1592 signed G. Guilielmus Rossaeus.The author is commonly thought to be William Rainold (Reynolds), an Oxford man and seminary priest trained at Douay's seminary-in-exile. Many of his contemporaries thought that William Gifford, later archbishop of Rheims, had a hand in it. It was not a particularly original work, but it does elaborate on the traditional scholastic theories on popular sovereignty. …

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