Academic journal article Military Review

Security Challenges and the Nature of Future War

Academic journal article Military Review

Security Challenges and the Nature of Future War

Article excerpt

In December 1990, profound, accelerating change was shattering 45 years of Cold War planning assumptions. In Military Review's special Soviet Army Studies Office (SASO) issue that month, one of my predecessors assessed what he saw as a central concern for the years ahead. Colonel David Glantz, who spent much of his career studying the Soviet army as a potential adversary, pointed out the "growing complexity of the postCold War world, a complexity we feel must be mastered if the promise of a dividend of peace is to be realized." Since Glantz made this observation, it has become clear that complexity was an excellent choice of words to characterize the emerging security environment.

As the world still looks to the United States for leadership, our Army continues to make hard choices about the force structure, operational concerns and doctrine appropriate for supporting US and allied interests in a multipolar world. Security challenges have evolved in simetimes unexpected ways. This led to SASO'S 1991 restructuring as the Foreign Military Studies Office (FMSO) with far broader analytical responsibilities. FMSO research programs over the last five years have been influenced by the requirement to win future wars and the emergence of a host of regional and transnational dangers whose military dimensions now demand the US Army's direct attention. FMSO, like its predecesor, is a small, unique analytic office operating within the Combined Arms Center (CAC), Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. FMSO develops an annual research plan to address CAC and broader Army and defense requirements and interests. …

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