Academic journal article Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research

A Conceptual Framework and Propositions for the Acceptance of Mobile Services

Academic journal article Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research

A Conceptual Framework and Propositions for the Acceptance of Mobile Services

Article excerpt

Abstract

Mobile services are heralded to create a tremendous spectrum of business opportunities. User acceptance of these services is of paramount importance. Consequently, a deeper insight into theory-based research is required to better understand the underlying motivations that lead users to adopting mobile services. As mobile services bring additional functional dimensions, including hedonic and experiential aspects, using extant models for predicting mobile services acceptance by individuals may be inadequate. The aim of this paper is to explore, analyse and critically assess the use of existing acceptance theories in the light of the evolving and ubiquitous mobile services and their underlying technologies. Constructs affecting consumer adoption behaviour are discussed and relevant propositions are made. Managerial implications are explored and future research directions are also identified.

Key words: Mobile services, innovation adoption, mCommerce

1 Introduction

Mobile technologies and services are heralded to create a tremendous spectrum of business opportunities. Mobile technology is enabled by the collective use of various communication infrastructure technologies and portable battery-powered devices. Mobile devices are powered by applications which deliver various services, enhancing flexibility, mobility, and efficiency for users within business and life domains. A mobile service is an activity or series of intangible activities that occur when mobile consumers interact with systems or service provider employees with the support of a mobile telecommunications network [97]. There are various categories of mobile services. For example, mobile content and information services (e.g. map, and location-based services, news, personalisation and entertainment content downloads) make information available to mobile users in different modalities; messaging services such as Short Message Service (SMS), Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) and email enable the exchange of text and multimedia messages; transaction-based services enable transactions such as mobile banking, airline reservations. In general, mobile services are ubiquitous and portable, and characterised by a personalised and context awareness nature. As a result, these services allow for single wireless devices, such as mobile phones, to be used seamlessly and pervasively across traditionally distinct spheres of life, such as work, home, or leisure [14]-[15], [59]. The mobile telecommunications industry predicts that mobile services constitute a massive source of potential revenue growth [6], [67]. Competition among operators is now largely based on value added content services and 3G rollouts which are expected to deliver multimedia-rich content to consumers. The two fastest growing categories are music and video/TV services, which are forecast to see a five-year compound annual growth rate of 190% and 112% respectively [49]-[51].

Despite the availability of technologically advanced mobile devices there is evidence that advanced mobile services which run on these have not been widely adopted [20], [56]. For example, the current penetration rate in many countries in Europe, North America, and Asia-Pacific, including Australia and New Zealand lags behind forerunners such as Japan and South Korea [41], [52], [67]. Given the difference between rapid growth rates in the adoption of mobile technologies and associated services in some countries and the relatively slow growth rates in others [13], [59] it is important to identify the factors that predict further adoption.

Personalisation, ubiquity and location specificity of mobile services make their adoption somewhat different from other Information and Communication Technology (ICT) services. High diffusion rates of mobile devices and services are evident in countries such as South Korea and Japan [20], [41]. Further, mobile technologies and the associated services integrate both the business and social domains of the user's life [36], [59]. …

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