Academic journal article Negro Educational Review

Defining the Situation: Educational Choices and Alternatives

Academic journal article Negro Educational Review

Defining the Situation: Educational Choices and Alternatives

Article excerpt

Over the years support for choices and alternatives has been a mainstay for The Negro Educational Review (NER). Choices in its decision to provide a forum for publishing literature that addresses a variety of issues are commonplace. Recommendations and decisions to select alternative research issues of interest across the African diaspora are foci of NER. Such issues addressed in Volume 57 of NER included students' feelings and behaviors, teacher preparation and attitudes, counselors' roles in schools, university faculty members relating to students, experiences of slaves and freed slaves, results of U.S. Supreme Court cases, and strategies used in public election campaigns. This issue of Volume 58 has equally challenging issues of interest.

Society's issues and/or news items are often presented and addressed through the print and electronic media. Consumers of these news items can receive and interpret them as positive or negative depending on their background orientation. As Editor-in-Chief of NER, often I find that I must consider both positive and negative presentations of selected issues and/or news items. As such, my aim has been to visualize first the whole issue, or in this case each journal, and then to visualize the sub-parts or individual pages of each issue. Sequencing and categorizing the diverse parts of each issue is a challenge. Nonetheless, I am pleased that authors continue to address a variety of topics. Continuously, such issues as educating elementary through college level students, preparing faculty members, identifying student and faculty behaviors, studying the impact of diseases, investigating race and ethnic matters, and examining political agendas all provide questions and concerns for research and discussion.

Authors of articles in this issue represent institutions of higher learning on two continents: Africa and America. Their topics of research are as varied as previous authors' in previous issues of NER. In the last volume authors addressed issues situated in the West Indies, Central America, Botswana, and the United States. This volume begins with an examination of health issues in tropical countries. Specifically, Nwoke, Nwoke, and Dozie's article describes the effects of lymphatic filariasis (an endemic parasitic disease) on afflicted persons and on endemic communities in sub-Saharan Africa, south East Asian and Pacific regions, and the Americas. …

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