Academic journal article Restoration and 18th Century Theatre Research

The Broadview Anthology of Restoration & Early Eighteenth-Century Drama, Concise Edition

Academic journal article Restoration and 18th Century Theatre Research

The Broadview Anthology of Restoration & Early Eighteenth-Century Drama, Concise Edition

Article excerpt

J. Douglas Canfield (General Editor), The Broadview Anthology of Restoration & Early Eighteenth-century Drama, Concise Edition. Broadview Press, 2003. xx & 1033 pp. ISBN 1551115816. $48.95.

Reviewing the full edition of The Broadview Anthology of Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Drama for Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Theatre Research (Volume 16, Number 2, Winter 2001), Gillian Manning's principal concern was that "the only serious drawback to the collection is its sheer size and weight." At 1,977 pages, the full anthology ran nearly double the new Concise Edition. Happily, Broadview Press seems alert to such concerns and the possibilities they offer. It takes up one option in the current edition by removing two of the original's nine sub-genres (heroic romance and political tragedy), trimming multiple works by the same authors (although Dryden retains a place of primacy in being represented by two titles), and winnowing the titles in four of the seven included sub-genres: social comedy (Etherege's The Man of Mode, Behn's The Rover, Congreve's The Way of the World, Trotter's Love at a Loss, and Centime's A Bold Stroke for a Wife); subversive comedy (Lacy's The Old Troop, Wycherley's The Country Wife, Shadwell's A True Widow, Farquar's The Beaux' Stratagem, and Gay's The Beggar's Opera); corrective satire (Vanbrugh's The Relapse); and menippean satire (Otway's Venice Preserved). Personal tragedy (Dryden's All for Love, Rowe's The Fair Penitent, and Lillo's The London Merchant); tragicomic romance (Dryden's Marriage a la Mode, Southerne's Oroonoko, and Steele's The Conscious Lovers); and laughing comedy (Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer, Sheridan's The School for Scandal, and Cowley's The Belle's Strategem) carry over all their titles from the full anthology. The three laughing comedies of the late eighteenth century almost belie the collection's title, but, as noted in the Introduction, they represent the "resurrection" of the type of comedies produced from 1660 to 1737. With the exception of these last three, the different sub-genres range across the period, as they are presented chronologically, in keeping with the historical focus of the collection.

A focus on historical contextualization is clearly constructed through the overarching summary of the period in the Introduction, concise consideration of the sub-genres, and a special note on the inclusion of actresses on the stage starting from the Restoration. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.