Academic journal article Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health

Editorial

Academic journal article Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health

Editorial

Article excerpt

Those of you fortunate enough to attend the APPPAH Congress in December, 2003, could not help but be struck by the resonance of findings in genetics and developmental neurobiology that are adding their voice to what the pioneers in prenatal and perinatal psychology and health have long intuited: very early life experiences, prenatal and perinatal experiences, do impact later development. Developments in these fields and related scientific fields are clearly demonstrating the physical reflections of early experience. Each of the articles in this Summer edition of the journal brings a slightly different perspective and the same resounding message: What happens to us early in life reverberates through all levels of our being.

In the lead article for this edition, we welcome Daniel J. Siegel, MD to our pages. Those of you who heard Dr. Siegel speak at the Congress will recognize the concepts presented and welcome this review. These concepts can be most briefly described as the neurobiology of attachment. You will find his discussion of the "high road" and "low road" in parenting situations invaluable for your own life and in understanding others. Clinicians working with families are sure to make this overview of Dr. Siegel's recent work a ready reference and will want to back it up with reading his work in more detail.

Our own Michael Trout, APPPAH newsletter editor and board member, brings us a very moving article and a case study you will long remember in his discussion of adaptation and resilience. He discusses with expertise and clarity the connections between very early life experience and their reflection in the brain and nervous system, then puts this in very human terms in his examples and the case study. Also based on a presentation at the December Congress in a precongress workshop, this article is sure to become a classic in the literature of pre- and perinatal psychology. …

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