Academic journal article Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education

Editorial

Academic journal article Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education

Editorial

Article excerpt

It is my pleasure to share some recent, positive developments for the Australian Journal of Outdoor Education. A journal banding research project, completed at the University of Newcastle, Australia sought to rank education related journals (See http://www.newcastle.edu.au/centre/sorti/Banding/mehtod.html). AJOE was ranked 97 out of 913 journals according to overall esteem and 103 out of 913 for quality. Whilst these results need to be interpreted cautiously, because there were some potential problems with the research methodology, it is still a positive result for AJOE. This is a credit to the authors, reviewers and editors with AJOE in the past and present.

Another positive development is the formalisation of an advisory board for the journal. Over the last three years, I have relied heavily on Peter Martin and Andy Brookes for wisdom and support on issues concerning the editorial process. I have nowe formalised this advisory board by recruiting the assistance of Robyn Zink, Mike Brown, and James Neill. These five experienced scholars will provide support and direction for the journal through to the end of 2008. I believe this is an important step in the process of further enhancing the quality and professionalism of the journal. The panel of reviewers, identified on the inside cover, will also continue to play an important role in the publication of quality papers relevant to the field of outdoor education. The membership of this panel has also grown to assist with the number of submissions the journal is receiving.

The six refereed papers in this issue address a broad range of important issues for outdoor education both in Australia and internationally and I trust you will find them engaging and stimulating. Four of the papers (Zink, Kane & Tucker, Gough, and Brookes) are reworked versions of papers presented at the 15th National Outdoor Education conference in Ballarat, Australia in September, 2007. However, to be included in this issue they have all been through the standard AJOE reviewing process.

The first paper in this issue by Robyn Zink follows up a theme that arose with the Outdoor and Environmental Studies unit in Victoria, Australia, regarding tensions between environment, race and ethnicity. Zink urges us to avoid simplistic characterisations which may prevent us from exploring the rich debate concerning peoples' interactions with the environment. …

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