Academic journal article Pre- and Peri-natal Psychology Journal

Editorial

Academic journal article Pre- and Peri-natal Psychology Journal

Editorial

Article excerpt

It is my great privilege to have been appointed as the third editor of the Pre- and Perinatal Psychology Journal (PPPJ). As an historian and professor of International Studies, I have spent several years living and working in the Middle East. At one point I visited Aphrodisias, the ancient city in Asia Minor dedicated to the goddess Aphrodite. I discovered that the Greek goddess of love was also known as Ilithyia, the goddess of childbirth. Barbara Walker maintains in her reference work The Woman's Encyclopedia of Myths and secrets that "women in childbirth prayed to Ilithyia Eleutho, the Goddess as Liberator, who freed the infant from the womb." My own liberation from the experiences of a traumatic cesarean birth began with a personal exploration of the pre- and perinatal process under the inspired guidance of Barbara Findeisen at Pocket Ranch Institute.

This issue of the PPPJ pays tribute to my editorial predecessors Thomas Verny and Charles Laughlin and to David Chamberlain, the current President of the Association for Pre- and Perinatal Psychology and Health (APPPAH). Tom Verny, the founder of the Journal and the sponsoring organization APPPAH, is internationally recognized for his pioneering accomplishments, including the seminal book The secret Life of the Unborn Child and (with Pamela Weintraub) the equally important work Nurturing the Unborn Child: A Nine Month Program for Soothing, Stimulating and Communicating with Your Unborn Baby. Tom is a constant inspiration to me and indeed to all who are involved in this work. David Chamberlain has made major additions to original research on the reliability of birth memory and the capabilities of unborn and newborn babies. His multiple publications include the popular book for parents, Babies Remember Birth. David's joyous spirit made my new assignment impossible to refuse. Charles Laughlin's contributions to pre- and perinatal psychology and anthropology, including the book Brain, Symbol and Experience, are as respected as his editorial expertise. Before he left for a sabbatical year among the Navajo, Charlie presented me with the great gift of his friendship and a perfectly organized editorial manual for the PPPJ. …

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