Academic journal article Pre- and Peri-natal Psychology Journal

Nurturing the Unborn Child: A Nine Month Program for Soothing, Stimulating and Communicating with Your Unborn Baby

Academic journal article Pre- and Peri-natal Psychology Journal

Nurturing the Unborn Child: A Nine Month Program for Soothing, Stimulating and Communicating with Your Unborn Baby

Article excerpt

Nurturing the Unborn Child: A Nine Month Program for Soothing, Stimulating and Communicating With Your Unborn Baby by Thomas Verny, MD and Pamela Weintraub. Delacorte Press, 1991, 219 pps., $18.00 (hardcover).

As the practice of obstetrics becomes more scientific, and more technology is used throughout pregnancy and birth, there seems to be a lessening concern for the emotional and spiritual dimensions of human existence. Medical management has improved, but expectant couples have few means to channel and cope with the intense emotions that accompany their pregnancy. Expectant couples for the most part seem unaware of the potential for their own emotional growth during the childbearing year as individuals and as a couple, and, through "making contact" with their unborn child, for the emotional growth of their child while still in the womb.

In Freud's day, emotional or personality development was believed to begin when a child is 2-3 years old. In the 1960s and 1970s the concept of "bonding", or establishing contact between mother and child soon after birth, brought thoughts of emotional growth into the delivery room, and the "experience of gestation" was seen as a starting point for personality development. With the advent of ultrasound, scientists could observe the unborn child in utero. More importantly, the intuitive feelings of attentive mothers-to-be, and the "way out" writings of Thomas Verny, MD in his book 'The secret Life of the Unborn Child," co-authored by John Kelly, were substantiated by observations on the ultrasound screen. Babies in utero have defined sensory capabilities and the fetus responds to sounds, touch, visual stimuli, and even taste. Research has also provided much evidence to confirm long held beliefs that the fetus does indeed respond to it's mother's emotions, and to her behaviors, such as patting her belly, poking at a leg or foot, and singing or dancing.

In his new, remarkable book, "Nurturing the Unborn Child," Thomas Verny, psychiatrist and founder of the Pre- and Perinatal Psychology Association of North America (PPPANA), has teamed up with Pamela Weintraub. …

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