Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Teaching and Learning in Northern Europe, 1000-1200

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Teaching and Learning in Northern Europe, 1000-1200

Article excerpt

Teaching and Learning in Northern Europe, 1000-1200. Edited by Sally N. Vaughn and Jay Rubenstein. [Studies in the Early Middle Ages, Vol. 8.] (Turnhout: Brepols Publishers. 2006. Pp. xxii, 362. euro60.00.)

The editors of this volume, urging that monastic schools remained important between 1000 and 1200 despite historians' focus on cathedral schools and nascent universities, assert that its contents collectively correct that imbalance. Given the essayists' limited attention to monastic libraries, biblical exegesis, chronicles, and music theory and praxis; their omission of monastic theology, art patronage, and female education; and the fact that they treat thinkers and schools not affiliated with monasticism almost as much as those that were, the collection itself is unbalanced. Readers are thus advised to ignore the editors' introductory claims and simply to welcome the book's contributions to medieval intellectual history, some quite original.

Contributors vary on whether "education" means schooling stricto sensu, the generic objectives of writers of didactic or prescriptive literature, or affective commitment to shared cultural values. The latter notion informs Mia Münster-Swenson's essay on bonds between teachers and students ca. 9701200, some familiar and others less so, unique here in citing German materials. Elsewhere in this book, "northern Europe" means England and France north of the Loire.The editors each reprise their own earlier publications, Vaughan discussing Lanfranc andAnselm as teachers and Rubenstein Guibert of Nogent on the Anglo-Normans. …

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