Academic journal article Nursing History Review

Compassion and Competence: Nursing in Mandatory Palestine, 1918-1948

Academic journal article Nursing History Review

Compassion and Competence: Nursing in Mandatory Palestine, 1918-1948

Article excerpt

Compassion and Competence: Nursing in Mandatory Palestine, 1918-1948 By Nira Banal (Jerusalem: Yard Izhak Ben-Zvi, 2005) (Hebrew, 444 pages; 98 NIS; $21 cloth)

Compassion and Competence is a comprehensive and thorough overview of the development of nutsing in Mandatory Palestine from 1918 to 1948. The accounts of nursing during those years, as argued by Nira Banal, have shaped the profession of the modern Hebrew and then Israeli nurse, as well as the development of nutsing as a profession in this region. It should also be seen within the global context of the changes that shaped the nursing profession. In her outstanding analysis, Banal discusses topics such as the study of nursing history, the creation and progress of nursing education, nursing as a feminine domain, and the specific story of the Hadassah School of Nursing in Jerusalem.

This historical analysis covers various periods that are all considered to be during the time of the British Mandate in Palestine. The first part focuses on the years between 1918 and 1933 when American nurses came to join Hadassah with a mission to prepare a sttucture and foundation that would tackle the problem of poor public health in Palestine. These Zionist Jewish Hadassah nurses helped define nursing and lay a basis for educating the former "noneducated" nurses to become professionals in their own tenitory and community settings. The more traditional Florence Nightingale concept of nursing dominated this period. The second part is devoted to the years 1933 to 1948, until the establishment of the State of Israel, which is characterized by the professional and academic development of nursing, as well as by the design of a curriculum to train nurses for future work. It should be emphasized that influences from abroad came both from British nursing, which influenced more the formal and political status of nursing, and from the American system, which was clinically advanced and more academic.

Banal has conducted extensive research, which includes archival work, analysis of historical documents, and hours of interviews of nursing figures who led the field and who left a mark in the profession's history. Her descriptions of the aspects that influenced nursing and the role of nursing, rhen, are therefore presented through the eyes of influential women such as Henrietta Zold, Shulamit Kantor, and others. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.