Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Diplomatarium of the Crusader Kingdom of Valencia: The Registered Charters of Its Conqueror, Jaume I, 1257-1276, Volume III (Documents 501-1000): Transition

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Diplomatarium of the Crusader Kingdom of Valencia: The Registered Charters of Its Conqueror, Jaume I, 1257-1276, Volume III (Documents 501-1000): Transition

Article excerpt

Diplomatarium of the Crusader Kingdom of Valencia: The Registered Charters of its Conqueror Jaume 1, 1257-1276, Volume III (Documents 501-1000): Transition in Crusader Valencia: Years of Triumph, Years of War, 1264-1270. Edited by Robert I. Burns, SJ. (Princeton: Princeton University Press. 2001. Pp. xi, 578. $69.50.)

This volume represents a singular segment of a larger and immensely valuable project to recapitulate in Latin and English charters from twenty-four royal registers that relate to the Kingdom of Valencia-twenty to thirty percent of the total-during the final twenty years of the reign of the Arago-Catalan monarch, Jaume the Conqueror. The first volume (1985) of this work provides an introduction to the reign and the archives and technical information necessary for interpreting the primary data. A second volume (1991) gives us 500 charters redacted between 1257 and 1263; the current volume, the third, continues with another 500 drawn from the years 1264-1270. Subsequent volumes promise another 2,000 charters written before the Conqueror's death in 1276 as well as a bibliography and an index.

The editor, the Reverend Robert I. Burns, S.J., acknowledges no organizing principle in the current volume beyond chronology, but does provide some context for the documents. These were the years of the Mudejar rebellions in Valencia and Murcia, the king's abortive crusade to Palestine, and continued tumult in the royal household. In an introduction Burns sketches several themes-or as he puts it, defines the several kinds of "space" in which Christian colonizers lived-that inform the myriad of often humdrum details characteristic of this documentation: political and ecclesiastical structures, the royal entourage, criminal activity, taxation, economic life, war and rebellion, Muslims and Jews, as well as women acting as queens, concubines, nuns, prostitutes, and widows. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.