Academic journal article Journal of Cultural Diversity

Research and under Represented Groups

Academic journal article Journal of Cultural Diversity

Research and under Represented Groups

Article excerpt

An important aspect of improving the healthcare of the United States under represented population is continued research on morbidity and mortality as well as intervention studies. However, one of the greatest barriers to inclusion of under represented populations in research is the distrust with research. The fear that African Americans have of research and the traditional health care system are clearly Sresented by Bernice Roberts Kennedy, PhD, APRN, C, Christopher Clomus Mathis, PhD and Angela Woods, MSN.

The impact of a health system that is not perceived as user friendly by African Americans and White elderly persons was researched by Karen Aroian, PhD, RN, Jillon Vander Wal, PhD, Rosalind Peters, PhD, RN and Nutrena Tate, MS, RN. The researchers collected demographic data and information on the health status of the study participants. The findings were that African Americans report they are significantly more dissatisfied with health care and demonstrate greater health responsibility than whites.

The fear of being a part of a research study also has an impact on the outcomes for men with prostate cancer. African American men are more likely to not only get prostate cancer but more than twice as likely to die from it. Clinical trials are important in developing research and treatment protocols for this devastating disease. Focus groups were used by Gail Hughes, DrPH, MPH, Denethia Sellers, MSW. PhD, Lionel Fraser, Jr., MD, Robert Teague, MSW and Bern'Nadette Knight, MSPH to examine the feelings of men and women. Common themes were the stigma of prostate cancer, the impact of prostate cancer on sexual performance, and family support as a means of coping. The trust/distrust of the non-black physicians, the feeling of being used when African Americans are needed to participant in studies and the lack of culturally sensitive health information are other themes that speak volumes about health care in America for under represented minorities.

JoAnn Oliver, MSN, RNC, CRNP completed a qualitative study that examined the personal attitudes and beliefs of rural African American men as it related to prostate cancer and screening. The men and their spouses / companions provided clear indication of their feelings not "feeling like anybody" when they see a health care provider. …

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