Academic journal article Anglican and Episcopal History

One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism: Studies in Christian Ecclesiality and Ecumenism in Honor of J. Robert Wright

Academic journal article Anglican and Episcopal History

One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism: Studies in Christian Ecclesiality and Ecumenism in Honor of J. Robert Wright

Article excerpt

One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism: Studies in Christian Ecclesiality and Ecumenism in Honor of J. Robert Wright. Edited by Marsha L. Dutton and Patrick Terrell Gray. (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans, 2006, Pp. xli, 346. $35.00.)

Few scholars have exercised the wide-ranging influence of J. Robert Wright, St. Mark's Professor of Ecclesiastical History at The General Theological Seminary, New York. Not only is Wright an expert on the medieval church, but also he has played a major role in many ecumenical and liturgical commissions, being the leading drafter of the recent full communion agreement with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the ministry document of Churches Uniting in Christ. He well deserves this superb festschrift.

Some authors focus on the early church. Walter R. Bouman sees women as ministers from the first times, Richard A. Norris, Jr. examines embryonic creedal declarations, Petra Heldt analyzes a controversial passage in Galatians, Patrick Terrell Gray delves into Origen's view of scripture, and Joanne McWilliam compares Augustine's teaching to that of the first council of Ephesus (431). Moving up in chronology, John V. Fleming fleshes out the figure of Gergon in Dante's Inferno, and Marsha L. Dutton casts Julian of Norwich as a proto-Anglican.

American Anglicanism is covered in several articles. To R. William Franklin, the American church still inhabits an eighteenth-century world in its relations with the wider communion. Robert Bruce Mullin compares the aristocratic posture of Bishop William White to the more republican stance of John Henry Hobart. Phillips Brooks is portrayed by Joseph Britton as manifesting a broadminded brand of orthodoxy. Robert W. Prichard uses a Virginia case to explore the wider patterns of democratization. …

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