Academic journal article The Journal of Negro Education

Founder of the Journal of Negro Education, Charles H. Thompson: Biosketch and Bibliography

Academic journal article The Journal of Negro Education

Founder of the Journal of Negro Education, Charles H. Thompson: Biosketch and Bibliography

Article excerpt

Howard University has been home to The Journal of Negro Education (JNE) since its founding in 1932. Of these 75 years, founder Charles H. Thompson served as Editor-In-Chief for 311A years. His contributions to JNE are immeasurable. During Professor Thompson's years of service, he published 122 editorials and 15 articles within the JNE-a noteworthy and enormous accomplishment. Professor Thompson laid a firm foundation in his leadership of The Journal; one that continues to embody The Journal seventy-five years after its founding. Therefore, it is only fitting to recognize the accomplishments of Dr. Thompson within this Legacy edition of the JNE. This brief article provides a listing of all Dr. Thompson's publications within the JNE and serves as a tribute to the founder whose legacy continues in the mission of the JNE as the oldest continuously published educational journal for and about Black people. The JNE was and continues to be the premier source of information on research, theory, and issues relevant to Black people.

Charles H. Thompson not only served as editor of the JNE, he also maintained a 40-year career at Howard University serving as chairman of the Department of Education, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, and Dean of the Graduate School. Prior to arriving at Howard University, this Mississippi-born educator earned bachelor's degrees from both Virginia Union University (1917) and the University of Chicago (1918) where he also received his master's degree. Thompson later attended the University of Chicago where he earned his place within the pages of Black history by becoming the first African American in America to earn his Ph.D. in Education-a remarkable feat.

Richard Kluger's book Simple Justice (1975) documented the establishment of the JNE and describes it as Thompson's "brainchild" with a sole purpose of "documenting the condition of Negro schools and exploring the implications of segregated education" (p. 168). Thompson's publications touched upon sensitive topics-ones that were painfully relevant to the upward mobility of Black people in America. Although many of his commentaries focused on issues and circumstances, which occurred during his tenure, the subjects of many of his editorials and articles addressed issues of his times as related to race and Blacks, availability and access to higher education, and juvenile delinquency. Other articles discussed monumental court cases that led to pivotal changes in educational attainment for Black law school students today such as in The University of Maryland v. Donald Gaines Murray (1936) case. In this court case, Thurgood Marshall successfully filed suit against the University of Maryland for denying entry to a qualified African American student (Donald Gaines). Thompson documented Thurgood Marshall's first triumphant civil rights court case without knowing the great impact he would have on African American education (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education, 1954). Thompson's editorials challenged the ratings of Black colleges and universities and documented historical events that affected the availability of education for Black people such as World War II, international politics, the Civil Rights Movement, segregated schools, and voting rights. Undoubtedly, Thompson held modern views on social issues related to matters of race relations, education, and civil rights.

Thompson faced many challenges during his editorship-challenges that were in direct opposition to his vision and purpose for The Journal. During his tenure, there were relatively few journals that published positive discussions on the education, social sciences, and civil rights of Black people in America. Other scholarly journals may have been reluctant to publish articles that focused on the needs of Blacks; they may have been biased and focused on negative attributes, while simultaneously justifying separate and inequitable attainment of education for Black people. In essence, Thompson had to go against the commonly published misperceptions of Black people to publish a new voice-one that would uplift and encourage the Black community's continued movement toward equitable educational opportunities. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.