Academic journal article African Studies Review

Development after Globalization: Theory and Practice for the Embattled South in a New Imperial Age

Academic journal article African Studies Review

Development after Globalization: Theory and Practice for the Embattled South in a New Imperial Age

Article excerpt

John S. Saul. Development After Globalization: Theory and Practice for the Embattled South in a New Imperial Age. London: Zed Books, 2006. xiii + 135 pp. Notes. $25.00. Paper.

This is a book that can be characterized in many ways. As a memoir, it presents John Saul's past and present ideas about a variety of issues of continuing concern to him-on development, dependency, globalization, inequality, and class. As a Marxist/socialist work, it both reiterates a commitment to basic Marxist ideas and seeks to find linkages with alternative frameworks for understanding and furthering the struggles of the oppressed. As an intellectual work, it contains quotations from, and Saul's comments on, a variety of Leftist intellectuals. As a moral treatise, it expresses concern for the poor and oppressed in the Third World. As an activist work, it seeks to encourage the young to join the struggle to overcome the inequalities between rich and poor and put an end to "virulent" or "rapacious" global capitalism. As a scholarly work, it consists of a set of previously published articles and papers sandwiched between, and linked by, a few comments Saul added to provide a semblance of continuity for this publication.

For those of us who were colleagues of the author at the University of Dar es Salaam in the early 1970s, much of what he says is familiar. He sees "capitalism as an inhuman and inegalitarian system of exploitation that needs to be overthrown" (55). And he wants to help scholar-activists understand "the kind of struggle (at once both intellectual and practical) which is so necessary," and to encourage them to contribute "to such a struggle's success" (8).

The persistence of these ideas despite changes both within and outside academia is remarkable. He is aware of "the sharp decline of socialist aspirations in many quarters, finding particular echo in. …

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