Academic journal article Journal of Applied Management and Entrepreneurship

Getting Your Way Everyday: Mastering the Lost Art of Pure Persuasion

Academic journal article Journal of Applied Management and Entrepreneurship

Getting Your Way Everyday: Mastering the Lost Art of Pure Persuasion

Article excerpt

Getting Your Way Everyday: Mastering the Lost Art of Pure Persuasion Alan Axelrod American Management Association (2007) 293 pages, Softcover, $17.95

In extant management literature, research in communication strategies and outcomes as it applies to the viability of organizations is sparsely pursued. Rather, theories in personality, traits, leadership, motivation, group dynamics, entrepreneurship, consumer behavior, etc, dominate the landscape of management literature. Attempts at implementing the objectives of these noted areas of focus, while furthering the success and viability of organizations, a focus on communication styles and outcomes is, without a doubt, an imperative worth considering. Rarely are managers and subordinates given a battery of tools required in the mastery of the semantics and syntax of language as it applies to their professional field of endeavor. Alan Axelrod, in his book, attempts to enlighten managers and subordinates alike about the power of persuasive communication.

Alan Axelrod begins by drawing on the power and influence of historical figures such as Aristotle, Cicero, Socrates, Quintilianus, etc, whose rhetorical prowess brought them great fame and attention, in the sometimes precarious political environment of ancient times. Alan Axelrod believes that ancient rhetorical styles still have a place in enriching modem communication styles. He posits that rhetoric can bridge the gap between emotion and logic, and in turn, logic and emotion. He draws on the basis of such rhetorical style in building his argument for the need and purpose for persuasion. Persuasion, he says, is generally organized into five components, namely exordium, narration, confirmation, refutation, and peroration.

Alan Axelrod attempts to demonstrate that persuasion must begin with arguments. Arguments, he notes, should be divorced from the individual who makes the arguments. …

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