Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

Follow Me: Christian Growth on the Pilgrim's Way

Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

Follow Me: Christian Growth on the Pilgrim's Way

Article excerpt

Follow Me: Christian Growth on the Pilgrim's Way. By Brett Webb-Mitchell. New York: Seabury Books, 2006. 174 pp. $16.00 (paper).

Whereas today's Christians sit, stand, and sometimes kneel in church pews, writer, educator, and Presbyterian minister Brett Webb-Mitchell reminds us that the first Christians were people of "the Way" (Acts 9:2). As founder and director of the School of the Pilgrim, Webb-Mitchell wants to reclaim and embody the notion of the Christian life as a journey. In Follow Me: Christian Growth on the Pilgrim's Way, he traces his own path from reading about pilgrimage to being on pilgrimages, and proposes that Christians are a pilgrim people who follow a Pilgrim God (p. 38). Pilgrimage is neither holy tourism nor spiritual sightseeing, but a way of life.

In each of eleven chapters, Webb-Mitchell narrates a different pilgrimage experience and shares lessons learned along the way. "Pilgrimage," he writes, "is the growth of a person resulting from an outward, exterior journey. It is more than a search for self, but a serious engagement of activities that deepen and strengthen one's grace-given relationship with the Holy" (pp. 40-41). The reader journeys with him from the first stirrings of desire to embark on a pilgrimage (chap. 1) to the hundred-mile walk to the Santuario de Chimayo in northern New Mexico (chap. 2). From there, we follow five Duke Divinity School students on their single file procession behind a six-foot cross on North Carolina roads where they confront racial tensions and human need (chap. 3). We go on to witness the devotion and gratitude of indigenous pilgrims who affix burning candles to the flagstone floor of the basilica that houses El Cristo Negro in Esquipulas, Guatemala (chap. 4). Next comes the 26.2 mile modern day pilgrimage-the marathon (chap. 5). We find ourselves in the backseat of the car on a family trip to Washington, DC, and in a silent graveyard on the Holy Isle, Lindisfarne (chaps. 6 and 7). Then we enter barefoot into the thousand-year old rhythm of prayer, fasting, and penance at St. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.