Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Breaking the Bounds: An Inaugural Lecture Given in the University of Cambridge, 16 February 2004

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Breaking the Bounds: An Inaugural Lecture Given in the University of Cambridge, 16 February 2004

Article excerpt

Evans, G. R. Breaking the Bounds: An Inaugural Lecture Given in the University of Cambridge, 16 February 2004. (New York: Cambridge University Press. 2004. Pp. 43. $11.00 paperback.)

In 2003 Charles Clarke, the then secretary of Education in the United Kingdom, publicly declared that in his opinion the government-funded universities of Britain should concentrate upon useful subjects: "I don't mind there being some medievalists around for ornamental purposes, but there is no reason for the state to pay for them." G. R. Evans, a Cambridge medievalist, retorted, "With a philistine thug like that in charge ... we need to protect the jobs of all the historians of thought and all the wordsmiths we can" (The Guardian, May 9, 2003).

Professor Evans is an astonishingly prolific scholar of medieval theology and intellectual and church history, her books ranging from the patristic era to the central Middle Ages and from Augustine and Gregory the Great to Anselm and Peter Lombard. But she has also written cogently about the challenges facing universities in the English-speaking world (especially in her Calling Academia to Account: Rights and Responsibilities [1999]). Breaking the Bounds draws in equal parts from Evans the medieval scholar and Evans the commentator upon the academic condition.

An Oxbridge inaugural lecture is an occasion when erudition and positionstaking publicly intertwine, often in a wittily mischievous way, and Professor Evans's is no exception. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.