Academic journal article Risk Management and Insurance Review

Introduction

Academic journal article Risk Management and Insurance Review

Introduction

Article excerpt

Mandates that employers either offer health insurance to their workers or pay a penalty play a central role in many proposals to reduce the ranks of the uninsured. While much attention is paid to the effects of such mandates on insurance coverage, different versions of these proposals have very different distributional implications and potential effects on labor markets and employment. This issue contains three articles that investigate the effects of these mandates, both intended and unintended. These articles were part of the Cornell University Symposium on the Economics of Employer "Pay or Play" Mandates organized by Richard Burkhauser and Kosali Simon and held on September 14, 2007 in Washington, D.C. The symposium was sponsored by a grant from the Employment Policies Institute to Cornell University.

Jonathan Gruber reviews the development of the Massachusetts reform plan, in which he was a crucial player, in "Massachusetts Health Care Reform: The View From One Year Out." Whether or not to include an employer pay or play component was a contentious issue, and the eventual compromise included a nominal penalty. Gruber reviews the rationale behind this and other choices (including pooling mechanisms, subsidies, individual mandates, and exemptions), the likely effects of the reform plan, and challenges for the future. In the discussion of this piece, common misconceptions about who bears the burden of employer mandates, and how these misconceptions drive surprising constituencies to lobby for and against mandates are highlighted.

In "Who Gets What From Employer Pay or Play Mandates?" Richard Burkhauser and Kosali Simon argue that these mandates are not particularly well targeted. They focus on a mandate originally proposed in New York and find that many of those who would gain insurance are living in families with incomes substantially above the poverty line. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.