Academic journal article The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association, Inc.

Jackson Backsaws in America-A Puzzle and A Query

Academic journal article The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association, Inc.

Jackson Backsaws in America-A Puzzle and A Query

Article excerpt

I am aware of two types of hacksaws marked "Jackson." Henry Disston manufactured hacksaws under the brand name "Jackson" beginning around 1860 and continuing until the 1930s (Figure 1). TheJackson brand was a lower grade than the company's regular production hacksaws and is very common. The Disston Jackson usually had an open handle, while in most of the regular Disston models of this time the open handle was rare. The other Jackson backsaw maker is William Jackson of Monroe, New York (Figure 2). Erv Schafer in his book Hand Saw Makers of North America lists a William Jackson as active circa 1820. This little-known maker did not leave much of a trail behind him. I find it interesting that the only saws I have seen with the Jackson mark are hacksaws. The twelve saws in my collection that bear his mark have no additional mark indicating location.

There is one definite clue to determining whether a saw is a Monroe Jackson or a Disston Jackson. The "J" in the two Jacksons are quite different. The Disston "J" has a nicely curved base (Figure 3a) while the base of the Monroe J is quite abrupt, almost clipped (Figure 3b). The difference in the Js is consistent in all the saws that I have examined to date. Further, the Monroe Jacksons have very pronounced stamping.

The earliest Monroe Jackson in my collection was made circa 1835 and has a beech handle with early saw screws and a steel back (Figures 4a and 4b). …

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