Academic journal article The Hymn

Sing to the Lord a New Song

Academic journal article The Hymn

Sing to the Lord a New Song

Article excerpt

Sing to the Lord a New Song by Clark Kimberling. Colfax, NC: Wayne Leupold Editions, 2006. 98+ix pp. ISBN-13: 978-1-881162-15-5. U.S. $16.25.

With 54 hymn settings on texts by five contemporary authors, this volume is full of musical variety. Flowing chant, Genevan Psalter, sturdy chorales, soaring unison lines, imaginative contemporary harmonies, and even a few flavors of gospel and blues appear in these pages. It is a pleasure to hear such wide-ranging diversity and expertise.

Clark Kimberling has been Professor of Mathematics at the University of Evansville since 1970, when he earned a Ph.D. at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago. Earlier he studied music and composition at North Texas State University and was a church organist in Texas and Louisiana. As a mathematician, his particular interest is triangle geometry and number theory. More than 100 of his articles are published in mathematics journals, and two of his books are Triangle Centers and Central Triangles (vol. 129 of Congressus Numerantium, 1998) and Geometry in Action (Springer, 2003). As a musician, his choral works are published by GIA and his recorder arrangements by MeI Bay. He is a life member of The Hymn Society, and has seven articles published from 2001-2005 in THE HYMN. Topics are John Wesley, Richard Wayne Dirksen, tunes lost and found, twentieth-century hymn descants, and "Three Native American Hymns," (vol. 56, No. 2, Spring 2005). Kimberling is a recorder player and sings bass in the choir at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Evansville; his wife Margaret is the organist there.

Small wonder that his music has many facets! The hymn tune HENDERSON is unusual, with a medieval flavor, double pedal points, harmonic accompaniment, unison melody in the first half, and parallel thirds sung in the second half. MARTHA AND MARY reflects a swinging gospel atmosphere. Unison settings predominate, sometimes with last lines in parts. …

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