Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Confessionalism and Pietism: Religious Reform in Early Modern Europe

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Confessionalism and Pietism: Religious Reform in Early Modern Europe

Article excerpt

Confessionalism and Pietism: Religious Reform in Early Modern Europe. Edited by Fred van Lieburg. [Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Europäische Geschichte Mainz, Abteilung für Abendländische Religionsgeschichte, Beiheft 67.] (Mainz:Verlag Philipp von Zabern. 2006. Pp. vi, 324. euro39,90.)

This first volume of three collections of essays presents the results of the editor's project "Cultural History of Pietism and Revivalism, c. 1650-c. 1850: An American, Dutch, and Nordic Connection." Readers unfamiliar with recent scholarship on the Pietist renewal movement in early modern Protestantism can sample both the important emphasis on the international dimensions of Pietism as well as its complicated relationship to the political and social transformations both within and beyond Europe. This first volume that specifically attempts to analyze Pietism's connection to the major Protestant confessional churches (Evangelical-Lutheran and Reformed) and the free church movements will be followed by subsequent collections that investigate Pietist revivalism and notions of "modernity" and finally the movement's impact on creating patterns and notions of religious dissent and social community in the Atlantic world of the eighteenth century

Most Anglophone readers will not have followed the dispute conducted largely in the journal Pietismus und Neuzeit that raged over whether Pietism is best understood as a "movement" primarily identified with European Protestantism from roughly 1675 to the late eighteenth century or part of a much deeper "tendency" toward revivals and renewals that transcend confessional boundaries of western Christianity continuing to the present day and far beyond the bounds of Europe itself. That debate was in part triggered by the appearance of the multi-volume Geschichte des Pietismus that has now replaced older standard reference works on the history of "Pietism"

The essays in this volume sensibly address the issue of whether one should juxtapose "pietism" and "confessionalism" at least in the early stages of the renewal movement, and seek to invite reflection on what long-term implications the "movement" or "tendency" bequeathed to the broader history of western Christianity The introductory piece by van Lieburg, and Hartmut Lehmann's summary essay provide contexts for the arguments of the contributors. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.