Academic journal article Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy

RET for Addictions and Addiction to RET

Academic journal article Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy

RET for Addictions and Addiction to RET

Article excerpt

RET for Addictions and Addiction to RET. When A A Doesn't Work for You: Rational Steps to Quitting Alcohol Albert Ellis and Emmett Velten. Fort Lee, NJ: Barricade Books, 1992. 329 pp., $14.95 (softcover).

In Rational Steps... Ellis and Velten provide a rational-emotive (RET) stance on addiction theory, and an overview of RET cognitive technology that they maintain will be useful as self-help for sufferers from alcohol abuse, dependence, or addiction. It is presented as an alternative perspective to Alcoholic's Anonymous, which they contend "irrationally" focuses, for example, on a "higher power," and on the status of "continually recovering." Rational Steps covers 17 chapters that focus on such topics as understanding alcohol problems and addictions, comparing RET with AA tenets, establishing self-help goals, employing step-by-step self-help, understanding self-defeating (stinking) think ing, integrating RET into self-help, and preventing relapse.

Although the plan of this book is ambitious, and the explanation of RET concepts is clear and detailed, the authors unfortunately do not provide an adequate educational base for self-helpers to understand the chemical, cognitive, and emotional bases of their chemical dependence difficulties. Self-help readers need to better understand the relationships between their immediate cognitions around drug use, their physical cravings and withdrawal syndrome, and thepharmacodynamics of their drug of choice. An in-depth presentation of these relationships is not provided.

Like most self-help psychology, the strength of this book lies in its power to persuade the naive reader to share a point of view about the nature, meaning, and treatment of alcohol dependence and addiction. Its weakness lies in its gloss of addiction problems which they encourage readers to resolve through RET means. Ellis and Velten make little effort to distinguish problem drinking or abuse from alcohol dependence or addiction, and recommend the same selfhelp strategy for everyone in their audience. They do not, for example, provide enough self-assessment advice for readers who are often ignorant of the signs and symptoms that may indicate a need for supervised detoxification. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.