Academic journal article Labor Law Journal

From the Editor

Academic journal article Labor Law Journal

From the Editor

Article excerpt

Dear Reader:

Since the 9/11 attack, national security has been a major concern. Who gets into the country has become such a preoccupation that in the absence of comprehensive immigration reform at the federal level, the states and even some municipalities have weighed in on the issue.

Now, the Department of Homeland security (DHS) has announced final regulations establishing minimum security standards for state-issued drivers' licenses and identification cards. Among other permitted uses, these secure drivers' licenses can be used by employers to verify an applicant's or employee's eligibility to work in the United States.

However, would a secure identification card limit the extent to which employees can be subjected to scrutiny by an employer for work or security purposes? A recent Ninth Circuit ruling in Nelson v NASA would seem to suggest that we still have a ways to go to reach that answer. "Low risk" contract employees employed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), including scientists, engineers, and administrative personnel, were granted an injunction against a requirement adopted by NASA that they submit to in-depth background investigations. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.