Academic journal article Tamara : Journal of Critical Postmodern Organization Science

Vampire's Empire: Another Gaming Environment for American Psychos

Academic journal article Tamara : Journal of Critical Postmodern Organization Science

Vampire's Empire: Another Gaming Environment for American Psychos

Article excerpt

ABSTRACT

LOAD MAP DATA # O BOOT CAMP: GROUND ZERO

In Vampire's Empire - a violent 80s arcade game - players crusade through unreal dungeons and haunt a cute-old-little vampire. Alike within any capitalistic endeavour, virtually controlling and violently executing command, is mandatory to win the game. Commonly, social order comes for free - accompanied by prevailing levels of social indifference. We are already familiar with the mission, well before the game begins: collecting as many points as possible, while attempting to focus a light stream upon the poor duke Dracula. Conceptually, Bret Easton EINs' novel American Psycho and Vampire's Empire got a lot in common, but one difference remains: Patrick Bateman, brilliantly performing as an all-star-vampire, never sees the light, and no-body seemingly haunts him. Here comes your assignment: Like alltoo-many-others, Patrick Bateman persists to luminously perform; due to invisibly organQzing hands, that immediately resolve every apparent conflict, within his gaming empire. Judged by first impression, Patrick Bateman is gaming within an empire without an exit - this is where your task begins. You are a MASTER OF INTERPRETATION (MOI), in charge to catch on empire's vampire. You will need to master this line of flight, to successfully complete your mission. The upcoming 9 game maps are getting increasingly incomprehensible, as you proceed. There are no time-restrictions. As your quest proceeds, new weapons, bonuses and surprises will be available: The better you look, the more you see[1].

As a common playground, both American Psycho and Vampire's Empire, build their stories on the destinies of information-agevampires. One is haunted by the spectre of an old-fashioned arcade-player, fuelled by the conventional wisdom to score, dominate and win. Another is doomed to impressively perform his deeds within the loops of an 80s-style greed society software. Sharp-looking Patrick Bateman just wants to fit in, and live up to the expectations of the New York greed society protocols. Patrick wanders around, like within a gigantic first-person-shooter-like simulation. Without the least of consequences, the effects of his moves violate every single moral law of the prevailing post-enlightened, global society. Yet, the quality of the Patrick character steams from a certain sensibility; while he is seizing all-too-many-things that go wrong, he pushes even harder. But two wrongs don't make a right. Breakdown symptoms of his virtual gaming environment are omni-present. Any affirmatively following observer is constantly expecting the end of Patrick's mission - his mistakes are just too obvious. His lawyer knows, just as well as his secretary - the symptoms of his violent pre-occupations are much rather murder & executions, than mergers & acquisitions. Besides, Bret Easton Ellis'American Psycho is not producing anything to justify his WTC corner office, but displays all the characteristics of a non-active activist[2] manager. Patrick's job appears to be the simulation of his job. He constantly operates on the verge of collapsing. At first sight, his violent actions appear to be the other side of socially required acts of repression; as if they were directly resulting from the heavyweight of his determined[3] and schizophrenic[4] life-style. A-life-style that really has become the life-style of an increasing number of corporate adventurers. You already realized this, right, together with the historical fact, that inter-faces of social connectivity (games, movies, and novels like American Psycho and Vampire's Empire) vary along with the Utopia (gaia[5], electricity[6], media[7], self-descriptive communication[8], code[9], or multitudinal virtual power[10]) that marks a respective society's phantasmic horizon. No wonder - a fair number of us, and them, grew up with regard to the phantasmic horizon of the 80s. Its traces and leftovers remain highly visible. Do not all of us maintain a fair deal of relationships with the kinds of Patrick Batemans'? …

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