Academic journal article Journal of Psychology and Christianity

Guest Editors' Page

Academic journal article Journal of Psychology and Christianity

Guest Editors' Page

Article excerpt

How do you do integration? Christian counseling professionals and trainees at all levels of training and experience are asked this question multiple times in their careers-on graduate entrance essays, in term papers by professors, by doctoral examination committees, during their first job interview, by students in integration classes that they teach, and most especially, by the clients whom they serve. If we are honest with ourselves and with the person asking the question, we usually struggle with the answer. Integration of faith and clinical practice is difficult to define, and even more difficult to explain to another person without having that person experience integration in the counseling office with you. If we are very honest, we usually have an answer to that question, though we often hesitate in responding.

It has been our clinical and teaching experience that the hesitation comes from the fear that we will answer the question incorrectly. There may be several reasons for this fear. One is that we fear evaluation. Another is that we lack practical, applied models of integration, tied to psychological theory, through which we can judge the appropriateness of our own response.

The purpose of this special issue on Religious and Spiritual Interventions in Christian Psychotherapy is to provide an honest answer to the question: how do you do integration? We have solicited responses from a range of differing theoretical orientations, denominational backgrounds, and integrative positions. …

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