Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Faculty Matters

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Faculty Matters

Article excerpt

EMELIA P. AMOAKO, PHD, APRN, BC, received her basic nursing education and her master's as a gerontological nurse practitioner at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she is now an assistant professor. In 2004, she earned her doctorate at UNC at Chapel Hill, where she specialized in minority health issues as well as gerontology and chronic disease management.

Born in Ghana, Emelia had three children before she began her nursing education. At UNC Greensboro, an NLN Center of Excellence, she teaches graduate-level courses in the Adult and Gerontological Nurse Practitioner Program and is a member of the PhD faculty. She serves as faculty liaison with preceptors for nurse practitioner students in primary care settings and nursing homes and, in the spring semester, she runs a nurse-managed wellness center in an older adult housing community.

For a course she is currently teaching in advanced health assessment in the nurse practitioner program, Emelia has students from India, Nigeria, Jamaica, and different regions of the United States. Students' ages range from their early 20s to their early 50s. And they have diverse nursing experience, including background work experience in the operating theater, cardiology, kidney, psychiatry, primary/acute care settings, and nursing homes. The goal, Emelia states, is to create a learning environment that meets the needs of all students.

Pointing to the challenges facing nursing and nursing education, Emelia observes that the current nursing shortage will likely continue due to the faculty shortage and insufficient clinical sites for student training. …

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