Academic journal article Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal

Quality of Life in Turkish University Students and Its Relationship to Levels of State-Trait Anxiety

Academic journal article Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal

Quality of Life in Turkish University Students and Its Relationship to Levels of State-Trait Anxiety

Article excerpt

The purpose of this study was to determine the quality of life (QOL) of students and to determine the relationship between state-trait anxiety levels and QOL. This research was done with ½ sampling method of 276 students at Erciyes University. The data were gathered via the WHOQOL-100 Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL Group, 1998) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger, Gorsuch, & Lushelle, 1970). The lowest scoring area in our study was the social impression facet. The area scoring highest was the personal belief area. Negative correlations were found between level of state anxiety and physical health, psychological well-being, and level of independence. Positive correlations were found between level of trait anxiety and physical health, psychological well-being, social relationships, environment, overall QOL and general health perceptions.

Keywords: Vocational college, quality of life, state-trait anxiety level.

Quality of life (QOL), defined as a person's perception of his or her physical and mental health (Wong, Cronin, Griffith, Irvine, & Guyatt, 2001), covers broad domains including physical, psychological, economic, spiritual and social well-being. QOL is described by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "people's perception of their situation in the culture and the value system they live in related with their goals, standards, expectations and ideas" (Alleyne, 2003, pp. 1-6). Many students are not successful, and the reason for this is that there are numerous psychological, institutional, social, and university background variables that influence their educational achievement. In the clinical setting individuals suffering from psychological disorders have low QOL. In studies it has been found that QOL is negatively correlated with levels of anxiety, major depression, and psychological distress in psychiatric inpatients, university counseling center outpatients and nonclinical undergraduate populations (Frisch, 1994). Because anxious personality is characterized by joylessness, negativity, and dissatisfaction with life (Millon, 1996) it can be expected that anxious personality should correlate negatively with overall level of self-reported QOL. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between students' perceived QOL and their state-trait anxiety level.

METHOD

SAMPLE

This cross-sectional research was done with a ½ sampling method of 276 students at Erciyes University Health Service Vocational College in the 2005-2006 academic year. The data were gathered via the WHOQOL-100 Quality of Life Scale, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). An additional questionnaire was administered regarding students' demographic data; age, gender, income, family type, house type, the area where the student lived, past illnesses.

INSTRUMENTS

WHOQOL-100 Quality of Life Scale The World Health Organization QOL Assessment (100-item version) (WHOQOL-100; WHOQOL Group, 1998) is a generic measure designed for use across a wide spectrum of psychological and physical disorders. It is a multi-dimensional, multilingual profile for subjective assessment. During development, focus groups of patients, health professionals, and healthy individuals proposed items that were selected and attached to a 5-point Likert response scale. The 100 items are organized into 25 facets, subsumed within six domains. WHOQOL-100 has four domains: physical health, psychological health, social relationships and environment. It also includes one facet covering overall QOL and general health. High scores indicate good QOL. Respondents judge their QOL for the previous two weeks. Fidaner et al. (1999) confirmed the reliability and validity of the scale for the Turkish population. The Turkish version of WHOQOL-100 has three extra questions on social impression.

State-Trait Anxiety Inventory STAI (Spielberger, Gorsuch, & Lushele, 1970) was translated from English to Turkish (Oner, 1978) and assessed for validity and reliability. …

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