Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Religión Y Política En la España Contemporánea

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Religión Y Política En la España Contemporánea

Article excerpt

Religión y política en la España contemporánea. Edited by Carolyn P. Boyd. [Estudios Políticos.] (Madrid: Centre de Estudios Políticos y Constitucionales. 2007. Pp. xii, 305. euro18,00 paperback.)

This book is based on an international conference held in Madrid in 2005. The twelve contributions are "stand-alones" but given a certain cohesion by the way they are grouped (under four headings) and at times intersect. The first section, "La religion y el estado," leads with a discussion by William CaEaghan of the privileges of the Church under the Restoration, showing how no liberal government between 1812 and 1923, even during times of greatest tension, contemplated the separation of Church and State. Ismael Saz disputes the tendency to assume that the Falange had always been part of National Catholicism; there was a Falangist "political religion" that was fascist, distinct from Catholicism or other forms of "religious politicization." Giuliana Di Febo observes antecedents of National Catholicism in the militant and aggressive Catholicism of the 1870s and 1880s, a period of crisis for Carlism. In "Cultura religiosa y cultura politica," Mary Vincent focuses on the "legitimacy" of the Franco regime, before presenting the Caudillo as custodian of all sociopolitical order, in a largely congenial alliance with the pre-Vatican II Church. Manuel Suárez Cortina grapples with the conflict among faith and science, Catholic orthodoxy, and freedom of conscience as the leitmotiv of the religious question for Krausian intellectuals. Krausianism clashed with both moderate and conservative Catholics, but also the more radical secularism of the federal left. Feliciano Montero points out that self-criticism within 1950s Catholicism was heralded by the resumption in 1947 of the "Conversaciones de San Sebastian," questioning the appropriateness of an established church and the Catholic Church's professed "political neutrality"; self-examination was also a hallmark of some Catholic intellectuals and journals. In "Religion y movilizacion politica," Julio de la Cueva Merino shows how anticlericalism, from the Restoration through to the second Republic, was intended by political elites to bring about secularization via measures implemented by a modernizing state. …

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