Academic journal article American Journal of Psychotherapy

Guest Editor's Introduction to "Psychotherapy Based on Identity Problems of Depressives," by Prof. Alfred Kraus

Academic journal article American Journal of Psychotherapy

Guest Editor's Introduction to "Psychotherapy Based on Identity Problems of Depressives," by Prof. Alfred Kraus

Article excerpt

Perhaps the simplest illustration of phenomenology comes from our perception that the earth is flat. We live in a world in which we both see and say that the sun rises; yet we think in another world where we know that the earth revolves around the sun. This is an example of the conflict between the lived world (Lebenswelt) and the known world. Phenomenology invites us to resolve the conflict by ceasing to identify the "real" with the objective (intellectually acknowledged) world and the lived world with the apparent (perceptually acknowledged) world. That is to say, for phenomenologists the path towards the object, such as perspective, is actually part of the object. Phenomenology shows how the lived world lies at the origin of the known or objective world. In this way and in this sense, the lived world is more truthful than the known or objective world. So in phenomenology we include the actual conditions under which the object is given to us in our definition of it. The fundamental axiom of phenomenology is that just as the trip to the holiday home is part of the holiday, the route towards the object is part of the object.

Dr. Kraus's paper illustrates the use of the phenomenological method to study the identity formation and the adoption of various roles by bipolar patients and major depressive patients. …

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