Academic journal article Southeastern Archaeology

The Archaeology and History of the Native Georgia Tribes

Academic journal article Southeastern Archaeology

The Archaeology and History of the Native Georgia Tribes

Article excerpt

The Archaeology and History of the Native Georgia Tribes. MAX E. WHITE. University Press of Florida, Gainesville, 2002. 176 pp., 60 figs., biblio., index. $55.00 (cloth), ISBN 0-8130-2576-1.

Reviewed by John T. Penman

Max E. White's Archaeology and History of the Native Georgia Tribes includes a foreword by Jerald T. Milanich, a preface, and eight chapters with the natural setting covered in the first chapter and the other seven dedicated to culture history from Paleoindian presence in Georgia beginning about 12,000 years before present (B.P.) to the 1830s, when Native Americans were forcibly removed from the state by the United States government.

The Paleoindian chapter discusses significant sites that date to approximately 12,000-10,000 B.P. (10,000-8000 B.C.). Maps of sites are presented, and the author discusses the implications for the absence of Paleoindian sites along the Atlantic Coast. The Archaic (8000-1000 B.C.) is discussed in chapter 3, as is rock art. The Woodland period (1000 B.C.-A.D. 1000) is discussed in chapter 4 and includes sites on the coastal area (Deptford) and the interior region to Kolomoki near the western edge of Georgia. Chapter 5 divides the Mississippian period into Early Mississippian (A.D. 1000-1200), Middle (A.D. 1200-1350), and Late Mississippian (A.D. 1350-1550). Coverage of such monumental Mississippian sites as Etowah and Ocmulgee emphasizes the vibrant nature of the late prehistoric period in Georgia. European contact and the early historic period is presented in chapter 6; and based on historic accounts and ethnographic evidence, the Creek, Cherokee, Yuchi, and other groups are detailed in the following chapter. The concluding section, chapter 8, focuses on the forced migration out of Georgia of the Creek and Cherokee.

White's Native Georgia is tailored to the layman and would serve well as a high school text or supplementary reference for college courses in Georgia history. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.