Academic journal article The Hymn

Editor's Notes

Academic journal article The Hymn

Editor's Notes

Article excerpt

(ProQuest: ... denotes non-USASCII text omitted.)

... . . . translates as "Holy Spirit is like the wind." These Chinese characters, appearing on the cover of this issue, form the title of a hymn by Wei-fan Wang. The hymnwriter continues the Spirit's comparison with wind in the lines "Where the wind blows, flowers bloom/Where the wind blows there is life." In our world of congregational song, wherever and whenever the Spirit's wind blows there are new songs for God's people everywhere to sing!

Wei-fan Wang is one Chinese hymnwriter that Emily Brink, F. H. S., includes in "Glimpses of Recent Chinese Hymnody." She challenges readers to rethink the traditional West-to-East flow of hymns and recognize the potential in a new generation of Chinese Christian hymnwriters a "more robust Chinese hymnody that will start to flow more strongly from East to West." In her article, Brink also notes the work of Xiao Min, who is the subject of an article reviewed by David W Music in "Hymns in Periodical Literature."

Of historical interest is David W Music's comprehensive article on Samuel F. Smith, author of "My Country 'tis of Thee," which introduces readers to the extensive hymns of Smith, the "Baptist Poet Laureate. …

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