Academic journal article Journalism Quarterly

How Journalists Are Trained in Britain/The Author Replies

Academic journal article Journalism Quarterly

How Journalists Are Trained in Britain/The Author Replies

Article excerpt

To the editor:

Philip Gaunt's article "The Training of Journalists in France, Britain and the U.S." (Journalism Quarterly, Fall 1988), is 12 years behind the times when it comes to describing British newspaper journalists as moving "into the electronic media" or coming from BBC training courses. As a result of initiatives taken at the London College of Printing, in starting the first college-based broadcast training course outside the BBC in 1977, ever-increasing numbers of (mainly) postgraduate students have created a new career pattern of entry into broadcasting. Indeed, the BBC has had to copy these kinds of courses in its local radio training unit. Ten broadcasting courses now exist, mainly in colleges running newspaper journalism courses.

It is unfortunate that Gaunt did not acquaint himself with the work of the Joint Advisory Committee for the Training of Radio Journalists started after a conference, called by the National Union of Journalists at the London College of Printing, back in 1980. The need for this committee arose because the"National Council for the Training of Journalists, financed mainly by newspapers, did not consider training broadcast journalists as coming within its remit. Gaunt also ignores the importance of the London University Journalism Diploma course which ran from 1919 to 1939. …

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