Academic journal article The Middle East Journal

Editor's Note

Academic journal article The Middle East Journal

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

Readers of the print edition of The Middle East Journal already will have noticed that, as we begin our 63rd year of publication, our cover has a new look. The Journal has had many changes in cover art in its more than six decades of life, and as we adapt our role to the information age (with an electronic edition and our full archive available through JSTOR and other services), it seemed time for a more modern, cleaner, and more readable look for the cover.

We have returned to an older tradition of incorporating a photo on the cover, as was done at various times, and with varying success, from the 1950s through the 1980s. Too often in the past we were limited to stock photos which did not really illustrate any of the articles, or did so poorly. With the greater availability of good photography in the digital age, we hope to be able to use more arresting photos to illustrate one (or more) of the major articles. The photo of Beirut by Alexandra Avakian seems striking without being overly stereotypical, and is appropriate to inaugurate our new look.

Rest assured, however, that the scholarly quality of our articles remains unchanged; though the cover may use shorter titles as a guide to what is inside, the articles themselves carry their fuller titles in the inside pages.

The issue opens with an analysis of the much-used (and abused) phrase "the Arab street" by Professors Terry Regier of the University of Chicago and Muhammad Ali Khalidi of York University. They argue that the Western media's reliance on the term "the Arab street" implies a volatility that is not present in the more neutral term "public opinion," usually applied to Western countries.

Professor Mark Long of Baylor University, who is a former intelligence analyst, offers a penetrating and useful contribution to the understanding of al-Qa'ida's ideology by analyzing the concept of ribat, or defense of the frontiers of Islam, and its role in al-Qa'ida's thinking and rhetoric. It is a complex argument, drawing on traditional Islamic scholarship to understand the thinking of the group today. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.