Academic journal article Dialogue : A Journal of Mormon Thought

Roundtable on Massacre at Mountain Meadows

Academic journal article Dialogue : A Journal of Mormon Thought

Roundtable on Massacre at Mountain Meadows

Article excerpt

Editor's note: The publication of Massacre at Mountain Meadows (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008) by Glen M. Leonard, Richard E. Turley Jr., and RonaldW.Walker, a history ofMormonism's darkest hour, is itself a history-making event. A scholarly discussion of their book and its significance in Mormon andWestern studies was held at the Salt Lake Public Library on September 5, 2008, sponsored by the Charles Redd Center for Western History at Brigham Young University, the Mormon History Association, the Tanner Humanities Center at the University of Utah, the Tanner Center forNon-Violent HumanRights also at theUniversity of Utah, and the Salt Lake City Public Library.

ROBERT A. GOLDBERG, professor of history and director of the Tanner Humanities Center at the University of Utah, chaired the panel. (See his review of Massacre at Mountain Meadows in the "Reviews" section, this volume). The three panelists were notable scholars with expertise in Western, Mormon, and Native American history. After their commentary and analysis of the book, one of its authors, Richard E. Turley Jr., responded extemporaneously. All four have edited transcripts of their remarks in that forum for publication here.

JOHN MACK FARAGHER is Arthur Unobskey Professor of American History at Yale University. His books include Women and Men on the Overland Trail (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1979); Sugar Creek: Life on the Illinois Prairie (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1986); Daniel Boone: The Life and Legend of an American Pioneer (Austin, Tex.: Holt, 1992); The American West: A New Interpretive History (Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Scott, Foresman, 2000) with Robert V. Hine; A Great and Noble Scheme: The Tragic Story of the Expulsion of the French Acadians from their American Homeland (New York: W. W. Norton, 2005); and Frontiers: A Short History of the American West (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2008), also with Robert V. Hine. He teaches the history of the American West and directs the Howard R. Lamar Center for the Study of Frontiers and Borders.

PHILIP L. BARLOW, Arrington Chair of Mormon History and Culture, joined the faculty at Utah State University in 2007. He earned a B.A. fromWeber State College and an M.T.S. and Th.D. (1988, with an emphasis on religion and American culture and on the history of Christianity) from Harvard University. In addition to articles, essays, and reviews, Dr. Barlow has published Mormons and the Bible: The Place of the Latter-Day Saints in American Religion (New York: Oxford University Press, 1991); The New Historical Atlas of Religion in America (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), with Edwin Scott Gaustad; and, as co-editor with Mark Silk, Religion and Public Life in the Midwest: America's Common Denominator? (Lanham, Md.: Alta Mira Press, 2004). He is past president of the Mormon History Association.

DONALD L. FIXICO is Distinguished Foundation Professor of History, Arizona State University, in Tempe. He is a policy historian and ethnohistorian. His work focuses on American Indians, oral history, and the U.S. West. He has published numerous books-three of them with the University of New Mexico Press in Albuquerque: Termination and Relocation: Federal Indian Policy, 1945-1960 (1986); The Urban Indian Experience in America (2000); and edited Rethinking American Indian History (1997). Other of his titles are Urban Indians (New York: Chelsea House Publications, 1991); The Invasion of Indian Country in the Twentieth Century: Tribal Natural Resources and American Capitalism (Norman, Okla.: University Press of Colorado, 1998); The American Indian Mind in a Linear World: American Indian Studies and Traditional Knowledge (New York: Routledge, 2003); Daily Life of Native Americans in the Twentieth Century (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2006); and edited Treaties with American Indians: An Encyclopedia of Rights, Conflicts, and Sovereignty, 3 vols. (Santa Barbara, Calif. …

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