Academic journal article Journal of Allied Health

Exploring Relationships to Three Types of Occupation Perceptions: Forced to Stay in Occupation, Voluntary Occupation Withdrawal Intent, and Involuntary Occupation Withdrawal

Academic journal article Journal of Allied Health

Exploring Relationships to Three Types of Occupation Perceptions: Forced to Stay in Occupation, Voluntary Occupation Withdrawal Intent, and Involuntary Occupation Withdrawal

Article excerpt

This study explored the relationships of demographic, work perception, work attitude, and limited occupation alternative variables to three distinct types of occupation perceptions: forced to stay in occupation (FTSO), voluntary occupation withdrawal intent (VOWI), and involuntary occupation withdrawal (IOW). An online sample of massage therapists and bodywork practitioners constituted the study sample. Hierarchical regression analyses for each occupation perception utilized slightly different sample sizes (i.e., FTSO. n = 1,982; VOWI, n = 2,039; IOW, n = 2,028) to test the study hypotheses. Regression results suggested some differential correlates for each perception, including the following: education level was negatively related to FTSO whereas occupation identification was positively related to FTSO, realistic expectations were negatively related to VOWI, and years in practice was positively related to IOW. Perceived limited occupational alternatives were positively related to FTSO but negatively related to VOWI. There were also common correlates across these perceptions. For example, work exhaustion had a positive relarionship to FTSO, VOWI, and IOW. Affective occupational commitment was positively related to FTSO but negatively related to VOWI and IOW. Social desirability response bias had a consistently negative but minimal impact on these occupation perceptions. Despite acknowledged limitations, this study is unique in comparing such occupation perceptions and hopefully will stimulate additional research using other allied health samples. J Allied Health 2009; 38:31-38.

ACADEMIC RESEARCH on leaving one's occupation suggests that it is typically a much more difficult type of work transition than leaving one's organization (job) due to the greater "costs," such as additional needed training and human capital investment, disrupted work relationships, and lost time and income, typically associated with occupational change.1-5 Many work organizations continue to restructure and employer-employee relationships have become less stable,6 including those in the health care industry.7 Based on such instability, some employees may be shifting their loyalty to a broader base of perceived stability (i.e., their occupation).8 The purpose of this study was to extend research on occupation perception variables using an online survey sample of massage therapists and bodywork practitioners (M 6k Bs). Prior research has generally focused on the perception of voluntary occupation withdrawal intent (VOWI), so this literature will first be briefly summarized.

Correlates of VOWI

Perhaps reflecting the difficulty of collecting actual occupation change data, prior survey-based research has focused on VOWI as the outcome.1-4,8-12 The only general psychological model of voluntary career change found in the literature was presented by Rhodes and Doering," in which changing one's career "refers to movement to a new occupation that is not part of a typical career progression." Rhodes and Doering" based their model on prior voluntary job turnover models, particularly Mobley et al.14 Rhodes and Doering" theorized that lower job satisfaction and career satisfaction lead to higher career withdrawal cognitions (including intent to change careers), which combined with search and availability of alternatives then leads to actual career change. More recent research suggests that occupation commitment can replace career satisfaction in explaining occupation withdrawal.10 Research supports job satisfaction, affective occupation commitment, and limited occupation alternatives each being negatively related to VOWI.10,15

Borrowing from the realistic job preview literature,16 when employees have job expectations consistent with what they experience, they tend to adapt better to their job situation. Such realistic expectations can be partially based on self-selection.16 Extending this idea to an occupation, having more realistic occupation expectations, including responsibilities and demands, may lower VOWI. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.