Academic journal article Online Journal of Issues in Nursing

Revisiting the American Nurses Association's First Position on Education for Nurses: A Comparative Analysis of the First and Second Position Statements on the Education of Nurses

Academic journal article Online Journal of Issues in Nursing

Revisiting the American Nurses Association's First Position on Education for Nurses: A Comparative Analysis of the First and Second Position Statements on the Education of Nurses

Article excerpt

Abstract

The mission of this article is to turn the clock back and compare the nursing education scene of the 1960s to contemporary educational practice. Specifically, the authors will re-examine their 2002 OJIN article, a discussion of the rationale and impact of the American Nurses' Association's 1965 statement on the education of nurses, in light of the recent statements of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN, 2003, 2004). As in the earlier article, the sentinel event examined is the enduring impact of the American Nurses Association's First Position Paper on Education for Nursing (ANA, 1965). The authors conclude this article by asking: Will nursing's most recent proclamations (AACN), which shift attention to advanced practice and raise the educational bar, affect the balance of power in healthcare?

Citation: Donley. R.; Flaherty, M.J. (April 30, 2008); "Revisiting the American Nurses Association's First Position on Education For Nurses: A Comparative Analysis of the First and Second Position Statements on the Education of Nurses "; OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Vol. 13 No. 2. Available: http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/vol132008/No2May08/ArticlePreviousTopic/EntryIntoPracticeUpdate.aspx

Editor's Note: This article is an update of an article previously published in OJIN on May 31, 2002 by Donley & Flaherty entitled, Revisiting the American Nurses Association's First Position on Education For Nurses.

Key Words: American Nurses Association First Position on Nursing Education, American Association of Colleges of Nursing Position Statement on the Practice Doctorate in Nursing, nursing education, entry into practice, nursing autonomy, financial control, nature of nursing, nursing supply

The mission of this article is to turn the clock back and compare the nursing education scene of the 1960s to contemporary educational practice. The mission of this article is to turn the clock back and compare the nursing education scene of the 1960s to contemporary educational practice. Specifically, the authors will re-examine their 2002 article, a discussion of the rationale and impact of the American Nurses Association (ANA) 1965 statement on the education of nurses, in light of the recent statements of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN, 2003, 2004; Donley & Flaherty, 2002). The October, 2004 pronouncement of the AACN, public and professional concern with safety and the quality of patient care (Kohn, Corrigan, & Donaldson, 2000), the serious nursing and nurse faculty shortages (Yordy, 2006), and the recent statement of the Institute of Medicine (2003) about the preparation of health professionals have prompted the authors to re-look at perennial questions about the educational preparation of nurses.

As in the earlier article, the sentinel event to be examined is the enduring impact of the American Nurses Association's First Position on Education for Nursing, published in December 1965 (ANA, 1965). Although the educators who authored the 1965 position paper were concerned with pre-service education, it seems appropriate to take another look at this first position statement on nursing education as the profession contemplates the implementation of another entry document, which establishes the doctor of nursing practice as the credential for the advanced practice of nursing.

...it seems appropriate to take another look at this first position statement on nursing education as the profession contemplates... another entry document, which establishes the doctor of nursing practice as the credential for the advanced practice of nursing. The 1965 document divided the health and nursing community by taking a stand on the level of education that the nurse should attain before she/he entered practice: "Education for those who work in nursing should take place in institutions of learning within the general system of education" (Committee on Nursing Education, 1965, p. …

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