Academic journal article Journal of Applied Finance

Letter from the Editors

Academic journal article Journal of Applied Finance

Letter from the Editors

Article excerpt

This is our second issue as editors of the Journal of Applied Finance (JAF). We were delighted to note that the first issue was received very well by our readers and we wish to thank all who sent us their feedback. We received positive feedback on the new layout of JAF with sections on academic and practitioner contributions, roundtable discussions, case and clinical studies, interviews, surveys, and book reviews. We will strive to keep these same features consistent across issues. Our continued success though depends on our ability to attract submissions in each of these categories, especially roundtables, surveys, case and clinical studies, and interviews. We would like to encourage our readers to be actively engaged in these types of submissions. As your editors, we are more than happy to work with you to develop submissions in these categories. We would also like to appeal to our practitioner community to consider writing for JAF and are willing to do what we can to identify academics that they can partner with.

In This Issue

As we mentioned in our first issue, one of our goals is to have one or two themes for each issue. In this issue our focus is on behavioral finance. Our lead article (Behavioral Finance: Quo Vadis?) provides the reader an overarching view of behavioral finance from its inception to the current state and beyond. It is based on a panel discussion held at the FMA-Europe meetings in Prague, 2008. The panelists included Werner De Bondt, Gulnur Muradoglu, Hersh Shefrin, and Sotiris Staikouras, who also authored the piece. Our academic contributions also include several articles on trading behavior: "The Long-Term Value of Trade Informativeness" by Michel Rakotomavo, "The Effects of Institutional Risk Control on Trader Behavior" by Ryan Garvey and Fei Wu; and "Why Do People Trade?" by Anne Dorn, Daniel Dorn, and Paul Sengmueller. There is also a provocative article on shareholder theory by Morris G Danielson, Jean L. Heck, and David R. Shaffer ("Shareholder TheoryHow Opponents and Proponents both Get It Wrong"). In addition, our academic and practitioner readers will also find the article on student management investment funds by Ed Lawrence to be of interest (Student Managed Investment Funds: An International Perspective)

The behavioral finance theme is continued in our practitioner contribution by Joseph Rizzi titled "Behavioral Basis of the Financial Crisis." This article also continues a theme from our first issue on the subprime crisis.

The behavioral finance theme continues in our "Pioneers of Finance" interview feature. …

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